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Lion's Gate Bridge Continue reading...

Ten Facts About the Lions Gate Bridge September 28, 2019

In 2005, the Lions Gate Bridge was designated a National Historic Site of Canada. It is certainly one of Vancouver’s most iconic landmarks, and in fact, has quite an interesting history. Taylor’s Dream 1. The Lions Gate Bridge was the brainchild of an engineering contractor named A.J. Taylor. Born in Victoria in 1887, by the early 1920’s he had become one of Vancouver’s most successful entrepreneurs. Then Taylor set his sights on West Vancouver, realizing the…

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Climate Change and Art September 27, 2019

Increasingly, artists are using their work as commentary on the effects and threats of climate change. History is filled with artists using their voice to affect society.  For some, this means using empathy and emotion to try to reach people. For others, it’s an attempt to visualize for people what our future may look like if we don’t change course.  “Only 5 per cent of us speak about [climate change] with any regularity. We need…

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Douglas Coupland’s Plastic World September 20, 2019

The bold colours and flawless textures of plastics were, for a longtime, sources of artistic inspiration for Douglas Coupland, one of Canada’s best-known artists and writers. But after confronting the impact of discarded plastics on the northern coast of Haida Gwaii, Coupland has changed his perspective on using plastics in the context of art. As Marshal Macluhan so aptly put it in the mid-sixties, “the medium is the message“. And the message of plastic is…

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Important Female Painters of the 19th & 20th Century September 18, 2019

As is the case in most other professions, so too, female artists are generally not awarded the same level of recognition as their male counterparts. The good news is, society appears to be slowly changing it’s pervasive androcentric biases. Evidence of this can be found not just in the corporate world, but in sports, music, and other highly skilled professions, not least of which, the arts. Here are a few notable 19th and 20th century…

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Stanley Park’s Surprises September 17, 2019

Spanning over 1000 acres, the Stanley Park is certainly one of Vancouver’s most adored and beautiful attractions. The park, which juts out from the northwest corner of the downtown area, was originally called Coal Penninsula. In the mid 1860’s, it was used as a military installation to guard entrance to the harbor. The Stanley Park Hollow Tree For more than 100 years, Stanley Park’s Hollow Tree has been Vancouver’s most popular tourist attraction. This 1000-year-old…

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The History of Whistler Village September 11, 2019

Whistler Village is less than two hours drive north of Vancouver. It’s a drive offering the unspeakable beauty of coastal island and spectacular mountain vistas. A popular destination year-round, you’ll be welcomed like family, and swept up by the excitement ‘The Village’. Whether skiing, biking, canoeing, hiking, meandering through the many shops, or just relaxing in a hot tub, Whistler is a wonderful destination spot, with much to discover. Stretching from North Vancouver to the…

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Counterfeit Art Fraudsters September 9, 2019

It has been estimated that as much as 20% of all the art in museums is counterfeit. Even while today’s digital technologies make it easier to spot, counterfeit art, especially the art of the masters, is big business. It’s a practice that probably started with the ancient Romans. Roman sculptors would often copy the works of the Greek masters, and pass them off as their own. During the Renaissance, with a quickly growing middle-class, the…

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The Vancouver Art Gallery September 2, 2019

The Vancouver Art Gallery was founded in 1931, and was then located at 1145 West Georgia Street. The 165,000 square-foot building was designed by Francis Rattenbury in 1905. The beautiful neoclassical building includes Ionic columns, formal porticos, a central dome, and ornate stonework. Rattenbury also designed the British Columbia Parliament Buildings, as well as the Empress Hotel in Victoria. In 1983, VAG moved to its current Hornby Street location, formerly the home of Vancouver’s provincial courthouse. Vancouver architect, Arthur Erickson, designed the renovations…

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